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What To Do When Migraines Affect Your Work Schedule

Migraines are terrible to deal with for people looking to avoid having to miss work on a frequent basis; even though some of the triggers are understood there seems to be no cure for what can be a blinding, debilitating feeling. But you can still find ways to keep your job or find other avenues like social security disability benefits.
Like asthma, migraines tend to require long-term medication programs as well as immediate action prescriptions to be taken at the onset of an attack. But the simple fact is that migraine sufferers can only hope to control the situation; even professional athletes face work absences because of the blinding headaches.
The problem is that it can cause enough absences to become a debilitating condition. Yet, the lack of hard evidence about its causes and the frequency can make it difficult to track if a person is unable to work and considering social security disability or other avenues.
That means that developing evidence of how pervasive your migraines are can give you a leg up in trying to establish a disability claim. Keeping track of triggers that include bright office lights, stress or others and keeping up-to-date with a family physician can give you the paperwork back-up for your social security disability claim.
Keep in mind that everyone has good days, but it can be difficult to show that you aren’t affected by migraines and still keep a workers’ comp claim open, especially if you’re a social media user. Migraines are perhaps more difficult than other conditions to address legally either through the social security disability or New York State Workers’ Compensation benefits claims process because of the intermittent nature.
Instead, keep track of when your condition goes from bad to worse and ask your employer for assistance if they can help you avoid known triggers. If you need more assistance in considering an application for social security disability, contact the legal team at Markoff & Mittman P.C., today.
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