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Chilean Miners Rescued After 69 Days of On the Job Captivity

Thirty-three Chilean miners were finally rescued within a twenty-four hour operation as of this morning. The miners were trapped for more than two months in a lightness, dank area of an underground mine. Specialists from all around the world were commissioned to assist in the rescue mission to bring the miners to the surface using a rescue hole barely wider than the capsule used in the rescue.
During their captivity underground, the miners had to deal with numerous hazards, including failing health of some of the men, frustration at the entrapment, and depression. They were put on special diets to keep their weight down. Personal trainers were brought in to keep the miner’s fit, with one miner using the mine shafts for a daily run.
A regional manager for the mine’s workers compensation insurance was even on hand to provide training as to how to speak and express themselves to the media. A book with the insurance company’s guidelines was even sent down a borehole used to provide the miners with supplies.
After the rescue of each man, they were greeted by family members and then take away to a local hospital for observation. The last miner to reach to surface was the 54 year old shift leader, Luis Urzua, who held to the task of organizing the lives of the trapped miners while trapped. Most of the miners were expected to be released from the hospital later today.
The rescue mission, though successful, will surely keep the requirements of mine safety and on the job injuries as an investigation moves forward. Additionally, while the miners may be back in the arms of loved ones, there are certain obstacles that will remain apart of their everyday life. Experts predict the potential for long-term stress reactions and other post-traumatic disorders among the men. In addition to the trauma, the miners will also have to find an effective way to deal with the drama and media attention being thrust upon them. It is not clear what compensation mine workers will be receiving.
There is also going to be more light shed on mine safety regulations. In most cases, the big companies have no problems meeting the international standards. It is often the small mine operations that start unlicensed that increase the risk of accidents and on the job injuries or fatalities. The Chilean President Sebastian Pinera recently terminated the top mining regulators after the mine initially collapse to demand accountability for the incident.

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